Lbrn SM

RSS
pewinternet:

Who in America is reading—and how. 
76% of U.S. adults ages 18+ said  they read at least 1 book in the past year. The typical American read 5 books in the past year.
More from our brand new report on electronic and print reading: http://pewrsr.ch/L9ZvQG

pewinternet:

Who in America is reading—and how. 

76% of U.S. adults ages 18+ said  they read at least 1 book in the past year. The typical American read 5 books in the past year.

More from our brand new report on electronic and print reading: http://pewrsr.ch/L9ZvQG

How the Google Books (Fair Use) Case Helped Me Find My Passion - District Dispatch

 ”Yes, a copyright owner may lose money when others legally use its works without paying, but what it gains is being part of a society in which access to knowledge is considered a defining, core, base value of society.  What it gains is contributing to a society that values education, individual participation in government, and free speech.  Without a healthy doctrine of fair use, we risk losing those rights.”

newyorker:

A cartoon by Roz Chast. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/19pATON

newyorker:

A cartoon by Roz Chast. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/19pATON

(Source: newyorker.com)

cloudunbound:

In the event that you don’t think that Amazon is in the habit of acquiring businesses, a chart dating to 2009 via Ebook Friendly. As EF points out, for a full history, sans the Goodreads buy, go here.
I haven’t heard of at least 70 percent of these companies.

cloudunbound:

In the event that you don’t think that Amazon is in the habit of acquiring businesses, a chart dating to 2009 via Ebook Friendly. As EF points out, for a full history, sans the Goodreads buy, go here.

I haven’t heard of at least 70 percent of these companies.

somervillearchives:

usnatarchives:

Get ready for Major League Baseball’s 2013 Opening Day with a new, free eBook from the National Archives!

“Baseball: The National Pastime in the National Archives” tells the story of baseball in America through documents, photographs, audio, video, and other records preserved at the National Archives.

The book can be downloaded for free on your iPhone, Android, iPad, and eReaders.

Learn about the two world wars, contract disputes, civil rights, equal access and opportunity on and off the playing field, the steroids era, Presidential involvement, improvements to the sport, Little League, Opening Day, and more.

Love it!

What struck me about the workshop — and part of why I felt it was so successful — was the curiosity it generated in the students. Students asked unprompted questions about not only Impact Factors, but open access journals, pay-to-publish journals, journal subscription fees, author reimbursement (or lack thereof), and tenure in academia. These are subjects that have almost never come up in my experience as an instructional librarian (with undergrads); the fact that these were student questions driven by their own investigative experience felt like a breakthrough, as if we crossed a threshold point in their understanding of scholarly resources. I feel like the minutiae of database search will now come more naturally to them despite the lack of any direct discussion of the subject — a win-win if there ever was one.

- Investigating Journals: An Information Literacy Workshop for Science Students | Daniel Ransom, The Pinakes: From Papyrus to PDF (via thepinakes)

uchicagopress:

July 3, 1997 
Jane Alexander  The National Endowment for the Arts 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue  Washington, DC 20506 
 Dear Jane Alexander, 
I just spoke with a young man from your office, who informed me that I had been chosen to be one of twelve recipients of the National Medal for the Arts at a ceremony at the White House in the fall. I told him at once that I could not accept such an award from President Clinton or this White House because the very meaning of art, as I understand it, is incompatible with the cynical politics of this administration. I want to clarify to you what I meant by my refusal. 
Anyone familiar with my work from the early Sixties on knows that I believe in art’s social presence—as breaker of official silences, as voice for those whose voices are disregarded, and as a human birthright.
In my lifetime I have seen the space for the arts opened by movements for social justice, the power of art to break despair. Over the past two decades I have witnessed the increasingly brutal impact of racial and economic injustice in our country. 
There is no simple formula for the relationship of art to justice. But I do know that art—in my own case the art of poetry—means nothing if it simply decorates the dinner table of power which holds it hostage. The radical disparities of wealth and power in America are widening at a devastating rate. A President cannot meaningfully honor certain token artists while the people at large are so dishonored. 
I know you have been engaged in a serious and disheartening struggle to save government funding for the arts, against those whose fear and suspicion of art is nakedly repressive. In the end, I don’t think we can separate art from overall human dignity and hope. My concern for my country is inextricable from my concerns as an artist. I could not participate in a ritual which would feel so hypocritical to me. 
 Sincerely,   Adrienne Rich   cc: President Clinton
**
Adrienne Rich’s “Final Notations” is included in The Open Door: One Hundred Poems, One Hundred Years of Poetry Magazine, forthcoming this fall.

uchicagopress:

July 3, 1997 

Jane Alexander
The National Endowment for the Arts
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC 20506 

 Dear Jane Alexander,

I just spoke with a young man from your office, who informed me that I had been chosen to be one of twelve recipients of the National Medal for the Arts at a ceremony at the White House in the fall. I told him at once that I could not accept such an award from President Clinton or this White House because the very meaning of art, as I understand it, is incompatible with the cynical politics of this administration. I want to clarify to you what I meant by my refusal.

Anyone familiar with my work from the early Sixties on knows that I believe in art’s social presence—as breaker of official silences, as voice for those whose voices are disregarded, and as a human birthright.

In my lifetime I have seen the space for the arts opened by movements for social justice, the power of art to break despair. Over the past two decades I have witnessed the increasingly brutal impact of racial and economic injustice in our country.

There is no simple formula for the relationship of art to justice. But I do know that art—in my own case the art of poetry—means nothing if it simply decorates the dinner table of power which holds it hostage. The radical disparities of wealth and power in America are widening at a devastating rate. A President cannot meaningfully honor certain token artists while the people at large are so dishonored.

I know you have been engaged in a serious and disheartening struggle to save government funding for the arts, against those whose fear and suspicion of art is nakedly repressive. In the end, I don’t think we can separate art from overall human dignity and hope. My concern for my country is inextricable from my concerns as an artist. I could not participate in a ritual which would feel so hypocritical to me.

 Sincerely,
 Adrienne Rich
 cc: President Clinton

**

Adrienne Rich’s “Final Notations” is included in The Open Door: One Hundred Poems, One Hundred Years of Poetry Magazine, forthcoming this fall.

In Memory of Adrienne Rich

libraryjournal:

nationalbook:

Adrienne Rich’s history-making 1974 National Book Award acceptance speech

“We, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Alice Walker, together accept this award in the name of all the women whose voices have gone and still go unheard in a patriarchal world, and in the name of those who, like us, have been tolerated as token women in this culture, often at great cost and in great pain.”

Feb 9

The single most significant thing we can do is have the best educated population in the world. It literally is the thing, the key that leads to everything else from our economic security to our physical security.

- Vice President Joe Biden • Speaking at Florida State University about America’s education. Biden said in his speech that he wants to make education in America more affordable, citing his own experience with higher education, in which his father was initially denied for a loan. Biden ended up going anyway, eventually getting a bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware, a law degree from Syracuse and a spot in the White House.  Biden says the Obama administration won’t waver from its goal of providing better education, while at the same time making it more affordable for more parts of society. Biden’s a bit up against it, though: His visit to Florida comes as the state legislature plans to vote on statewide tuition hikes. source (viafollow)

Feb 8

Anger from a student

firstgencollege:

It’s students’ voices like this that makes my work even more important. All students should feel supported!

Concise and moving piece from a first gen student attending an exclusive college.

…No one told me about the anger I’d feel when 90% of my class raises their hand when the professor asks who has visited country x, y, and z when I’ve never left the country.  Or how frustrating it feels to have to check my bank account before every purchase while my classmates receive money week after week from parents’ seemingly bottomless bank accounts.  The anger that springs up when I’m searching for a summer internship because they’re all unpaid and I don’t have enough experience for the paid ones because I spend my summers working… 

Feb 8

I Can’t Believe You’re Throwing Out Books!

awesomearchives:

missrumphiusproject:

“Realizing that people object so strongly to throwing out books, I began to save a few of the most egregious examples to show people who got upset.   The library owned a book entitled Careers for Women that included secretary, piano teacher and flight attendant, but strangely enough, not public school teacher, let alone financial analyst specializing in mergers and acquisitions.  An anthropology book  called The Races of Man explained, scientifically of course, why some races were more evolved than others.  A book originally published in the 19th century and gamely reprinted in the 1920s, defended the early European settlers of North America, downplaying their casual brutality towards the Indians by recasting their actions in light of their Christian intentions.  Most of the discards were old, but some weren’t:  I’d put aside two books from the late 1990s elucidating the scourge of satanic ritual abuse and how students could protect themselves and their communities against it.  These were the thin hardcovers you probably remember from your own middle-school library, the ones designed for student reports, with lots of pictures and quotations from experts.  While well-researched and decently written, these books had the rather serious drawback of shedding light on a crime that has since been proven not to exist, although not before a number of innocent people were thrown into prison for committing it.

Student bibliophiles have lost interest and given up by this point, but teachers persist.  “You shouldn’t throw them out, though!  There are schools that don’t have any books in their libraries!  Libraries whose budgets have been cut!  Can’t you donate them to Paterson?”  Poor Paterson.   This argument, to me, smacks of a patronizing classism, though kindly meant.  We’ve already established that these books could do more harm than good and do not merit inclusion in the collection of our very well-off school’s library.  But give them to those poor Paterson kids, for whom the books would be that much worse for not having anything more recent on the shelf to compare them to.”

(I’m having a difficult time not quoting this whole article. Read the whole thing, really. Every word. h/t American Library Association Twitter)

Aha… I was that kid pulling library discards from the trash bin. (I threw in more than I took out, though.) And my “burn the books*” phase was later, so they are all still safe and sound in my room. I even read a few of them. One turned out to be in the top 5 of my favorite books.

 To me, what matters about a book is the contents. 

Exactly. And the contents of a book are often valuable in the context of their use. In a public or school library, outdated and unread books are useless. In the context of an academic library or archive, historiography starts coming into play. But if a school library can’t even get them to take something, that’s appraisal at work, imo.

*I’ve never actually burned a book, although some have tempted my resolve.

(Source: twitter.com)

Feb 7

petepereira:

Oh Portlandia. Thanks for making fun of helicopter parents for me. 

Feb 7

Why Pay for Intro Textbooks?

"…soon, introductory physics texts will have a new competitor, developed at Rice University. A free online physics book, peer-reviewed and designed to compete with major publishers’ offerings, will debut next month through the non-profit publisher OpenStax College.

Using Rice’s Connexions platform, OpenStax will offer free course materials for five common introductory classes. The textbooks are open to classes anywhere and organizers believe the programs could save students $90 million in the next five years if the books capture 10 percent of the national market. OpenStax is funded by grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the 20 Million Minds Foundation and the Maxfield Foundation.”

from Inside Higher Ed

Feb 7
laphamsquarterly:

“The room in which the boys were fed was a large stone hall with a copper at one end, out of which the master, dressed in an apron for the purpose and assisted by one or two women, ladled the gruel at mealtimes, of which composition each boy had one porringer, and no more—except on festive occasions…” —Oliver Twist
Here’s a festive occasion: Happy 200th Birthday Charles Dickens!
And yes, you can have some more.

laphamsquarterly:

“The room in which the boys were fed was a large stone hall with a copper at one end, out of which the master, dressed in an apron for the purpose and assisted by one or two women, ladled the gruel at mealtimes, of which composition each boy had one porringer, and no more—except on festive occasions…” —Oliver Twist

Here’s a festive occasion: Happy 200th Birthday Charles Dickens!

And yes, you can have some more.